New World Wines: Mexico

Mexico is emerging as one of the most prominent wine producing areas in the Americas, otherwise known as the countries of the New World. Mexico has a grand and storied history. Over four hundred years ago, missionaries endeavored greatly to take discovered grapevines to Mexico.

In present-day Mexico, the wine industry is only sixty years old. There has always been an implied rivalry between Spain and Mexico. This may be due to the fact that the Spaniards viewed them as competitors in growing and cultivating newly discovered vines during the 14 and 1500s. And as Mexico surpassed Spain in the winemaking industry, their rivalry. Over time, a certain amount of leeway has been given to disperse the rivalry, and that’s in the middle of continuing progress in wine and winemaking in Mexico particularly.

Mexico’s progress was further propelled when James Concannon, a Californian, was successful in his campaign that encouraged, Profiro Diaz, then President of Mexico, to take critical measures to improving the viticulture industry. The plan was to show the world that that was possible to grow and develop Mexican wine commercially better than was previously thought by utilizing specific v. vinfera- vines from Livermore, California. This notion and spark of ingenuity led to the immediate importing of several million handmade cuttings. These were then furnished and planted across the landscape of Mexico. In preparation of the massive supply of grapes, that a bodega with hardwood flooring was established in every state was the next move Mexico did.

Vineyards were also grown and developed in designated places like Saltillo, Mexico City, Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Durango and Chihuahua. The Mexican Government provided a massive boost to its wine industry when the World War II ended. By promulgating restrictions as to the number of imported wines, the prices of US, French and Spanish wines became five more expensive than that of wines from Mexico.